Aleksandr Dugin’s ‘Last War Of The World Island’

Perhaps nobody who could be considered part of the new ‘Right Renaissance‘ is as controversial and fascinating to hear from as Russia’s Aleksandr Dugin. Born in Moscow, 1962, to a military family, he took a particular interest in history and philosophy, even going so far as to translate the works of authors such as René Guénon and…

Mikhail Bulgakov’s ‘The Master and Margarita’

The first piece of fiction I have reviewed here, but it seems appropriate to provide my own reflections on the novel which has been called by some a ‘masterpiece of the 20th Century’, since it has theopolitical undertones, and was recommended to me by none other than AntiDem.Mikhail Bulgakov was a Russian author and playwrite,…

Julius Evola’s ‘Ride the Tiger’

Written in 1961, and given the subtitle of ‘A Survival Manual for the Aristocrats of the Soul’, Ride the Tiger may represent Evola’s best-known work, even if his magnum opus is indeed ‘Revolt Against the Modern World’. Here, rather than delving into ancient history and ruminations of esotericism, or fully involving himself in a crude…

Corneliu Zelea Codreanu’s ‘For My Legionaries’

It is appropriate that I publish this review now, as today is the birthday of the man affectionately known by all who knew him as Căpitanul. Born in 1899 in Huși, Romania, Corneliu Zelea Codreanu is by no means a household name outside of his home country despite a tremendous heroic and tragic legacy. The book itself is an…

Bryce Laliberte’s ‘What is Neoreaction?’

Bryce Laliberte, the former prolific blogger of AnarchoPapist and Unterrorist, as well as former regular columnist at Social Matter, may have left his philosophical pursuits behind, but the contributions he made to the radical right were varied and of a high quality.His first and only published work was ‘What is Neoreaction?’ or (its long-form title)…